Yemen bans armed guards on ships

19/1/2012 -

 

Source: DefenceWeb

Yemen has banned ships carrying armed guards from entering Yemeni ports in an attempt to limit the number of weapons and ammunition entering Yemen, according to Shiptalk.

Shiptalk reports that marine inspector will monitor foreign armed guards on ships entering Yemeni ports. The directive was revealed in a Marine Affairs memo released late last year.

Evidence shows that vessels with armed guards are less likely to be successfully attacked, and no vessel with armed guards has ever been hijacked. This is why a growing number of nations have been approving the use of armed guards aboard ships. In November last year the UK published rules regulating the carriage of armed guards on British merchant ships sailing off the coast of Somalia, after a significant increase in the number of attacks against vessels in the Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden.

The Ministry of Transport said that in the last four years, 64 people have lost their lives as a consequence of Somali piracy.

The United States also reversed their opposition to having armed guards on merchant ships. Late last year the Greek ministry of security said that Greek merchant ships will soon be able to carry armed guards to ward off pirates. Greece is one of only a few countries with major shipping fleets to currently ban armed guards on its vessels, alongside countries such as Japan and the Netherlands.

The Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO), which represents (65%) of the worlds shipping, said that new private maritime security firms are springing up almost daily to meet ship owners growing demands for their services for vessels operating in high risk areas. It is very important that this new sector is regulated and that harmonised terms are developed and agreed. BIMCO has given this project the highest, the council said.

The International Chamber of Shipping, which represents over 80 percent of the world's merchant fleet, said that arming guards was likely to be effective in deterring pirates for now, but was not a long-term solution. "Whilst we welcome it, it is a short-term palliative measure," ICS secretary general Peter Hinchliffe told Reuters.

Somali pirates, operating from the shores of the lawless state in the Horn of Africa, have raked in millions of dollars a year in ransoms from scores of hijacked ships from around the world, including oil super tankers. The shipping industry recently called on the United Nations to create an armed military force to be deployed on vessels to counter the escalating menace from the armed seaborne gangs.

Maritime piracy is estimated to cost the global economy between US$7 billion and US$12 billion a year through higher shipping costs and ransom payments.Yemen has banned ships carrying armed guards from entering Yemeni ports in an attempt to limit the number of weapons and ammunition entering Yemen, according to Shiptalk.

Shiptalk reports that marine inspector will monitor foreign armed guards on ships entering Yemeni ports. The directive was revealed in a Marine Affairs memo released late last year.

Evidence shows that vessels with armed guards are less likely to be successfully attacked, and no vessel with armed guards has ever been hijacked. This is why a growing number of nations have been approving the use of armed guards aboard ships. In November last year the UK published rules regulating the carriage of armed guards on British merchant ships sailing off the coast of Somalia, after a significant increase in the number of attacks against vessels in the Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden.

The Ministry of Transport said that in the last four years, 64 people have lost their lives as a consequence of Somali piracy.

The United States also reversed their opposition to having armed guards on merchant ships. Late last year the Greek ministry of security said that Greek merchant ships will soon be able to carry armed guards to ward off pirates. Greece is one of only a few countries with major shipping fleets to currently ban armed guards on its vessels, alongside countries such as Japan and the Netherlands.

The Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO), which represents (65%) of the worlds shipping, said that new private maritime security firms are springing up almost daily to meet ship owners growing demands for their services for vessels operating in high risk areas. It is very important that this new sector is regulated and that harmonised terms are developed and agreed. BIMCO has given this project the highest, the council said.

The International Chamber of Shipping, which represents over 80 percent of the world's merchant fleet, said that arming guards was likely to be effective in deterring pirates for now, but was not a long-term solution. "Whilst we welcome it, it is a short-term palliative

Somali pirates, operating from the shores of the lawless state in the Horn of Africa, have raked in millions of dollars a year in ransoms from scores of hijacked ships from around the world, including oil super tankers. The shipping industry recently called on the United Nations to create an armed military force to be deployed on vessels to counter the escalating menace from the armed seaborne gangs.

Maritime piracy is estimated to cost the global economy between US$7 billion and US$12 billion a year through higher shipping costs and ransom payments.